Wrapping up 2019

You might think I’d welcome a few weeks off from this blog.  I did, but, in a strange way, I missed it, too.  It’s become such a daily part of my life to read and review books that it felt a little empty to not be posting each day.

But before you start feeling too sorry for me, let me add that I found a few more books from 2019 to read, and am sharing them below.  And we’ll return to our regularly scheduled reviews of the first books of 2020 tomorrow.

 

Dog Driven by Terry Lynn Johnson

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Full disclosure: I only read the first chapter of this book, but I believe Terry Lynn Johnson should be better known.  I loved her Ice Dogs and the Survivor Diaries series.  This one is about a girl with a degenerative vision disorder who goes on a sled dog race for her sister who has a more advanced case of the same disorder.  Looks like lots of adventure!  (240 pages; grades 4-7)

 

More to the Story by Hena Khan

Published by Salaam Reads/Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers

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With Little Women in the news once again, this modern-day interpretation should be relatively easy to book talk.  Maryam, Jameela, Bisma, and Aleeza are four Pakistani-American girls who must deal with their father’s job overseas, a new boy in their lives, and Bisma’s life-threatening illness. (272 pages; grades 4-7)

 

M Is for Movement: A.K.A. Humans Can’t Eat Golf Balls by Innosanto Nagara

Published by Triangle Square

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This unique book is called a “fictionalized memoir”, but much of it seems true to Nagara’s life.  The narrator tells of his childhood growing up in Indonesia, where he witnessed small protests being carried out by friends and family against an unjust government.  As an adult, he was part of the movement that eventually ousted that government.  With the 2020 election just around the corner, this may inspire you to strap on your activist shoes and get to work. (96 pages; grades 3-7)

 

Diary of an Ice Princess: Snow Place Like Home by Christina Soontornvat

Published by Scholastic (but then, you probably guessed that already)

Image result for snow place like home soontornvat

Yes, folks, this is what I read on my time off.  The diary format, the hot pink illustrations, a cool princess with a hidden superpower…Scholastic certainly does have its finger firmly on the pulse of today’s Disney-saturated youth.  Yet despite my cynicism, I found the story well-done, and honestly, kind of a page-turner. (128 pages; grades 1-4)

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