Above the Rim: How Elgin Baylor Changed Basketball by Jen Bryant, illustrated by Frank Morrison

Published by Harry N. Abrams

Above the Rim: How Elgin Baylor Changed Basketball: Bryant, Jen, Morrison,  Frank: 9781419741081: Amazon.com: Books
Sixty years on, an NBA story teaches about racial injustice | MPR News

Summary:  Growing up in a segregated neighborhood in Washington, D.C., Elgin Baylor didn’t have much opportunity to learn how to play basketball.  So he taught himself.  When he got to high school and college, coaches were amazed at his style of play, so different from what they were accustomed to.  In 1958, Elgin was drafted by the Minnesota Lakers.  His pro ball career coincided with events in the civil rights movement.  Elgin himself took a stand after experiencing discrimination at hotels and restaurants when his team played in West Virginia.  He refused to suit up with the team, disappointing fans who had come to see him play, but using his status to make a statement.  A few weeks later, the NBA commissioner ruled that teams would no longer stay in hotels or eat in restaurants that practiced discrimination.  The following year, in 1959, Elgin was chosen as NBA Rookie of the Year.  Includes an author’s note describing how Elgin Baylor changed basketball and influenced players like Julius Irving, Michael Jordan, and LeBron James, as well as a list of additional resources, and a timeline of both Baylor’s life and events in the civil rights movement.  40 pages; grades 2-6.

Pros:  Basketball fans will enjoy this look at a lesser-known player who changed the game and influenced some other players they may have heard of.  Frank Morrison’s action-shot illustrations are amazing and should be looked at by the Coretta Scott King and/or Caldecott committees.

Cons:  Some sources recommend this book for preschoolers or kindergarteners, but with the civil rights events woven in and extensive back matter, it’s a better book for older elementary kids.

If you would like to buy this book on Amazon, click here.

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